Accommodating children with disabilities in the classroom

posted by | Leave a comment

Accommodations are designed to give kids ways to learn and demonstrate knowledge of the same material as other kids their age. Accommodations don’t lower the expectations for what kids learn.

For example, if your child has trouble with writing, the teacher might let him give answers to a test verbally. They don’t change what kids are taught or tested on.

The activities and materials used in most early childhood classrooms are designed to meet the needs of many children with or without disabilities.

When they do not meet the specific needs of a child, they can be adapted or expanded to accommodate that child's individual needs.

They allow children to use their current skills while promoting the acquisition of new skills.For many students with disabilities—and for many without—the key to success in the classroom lies in having appropriate adaptations, accommodations, and modifications made to the instruction and other classroom activities.Some adaptations are as simple as moving a distractible student to the front of the class or away from the pencil sharpener or the window.It is not always obvious what adaptations, accommodations, or modifications would be beneficial for a particular student, or how changes to the curriculum, its presentation, the classroom setting, or student evaluation might be made.This page is intended to help teachers and others find information that can guide them in making appropriate changes in the classroom based on what their students need.

Leave a Reply

Adult chat java chat